REVIEW: Towards Atlantis Lights - Dust of Aeons (Transcending Obscurity)

 Powerfully emotional, Towards Atlantis Lights draws from historical moments and blends folk, doom, death, and black metal elements together in order to bring their story to life on Dust of Aeons. And, by story, I mean an epic spanning four tracks, one of which is a whopping 30 minutes (The Bunker of Life) and the other over 16 (Alexandria's Library). It's a somewhat short run time on paper, but the density and captivating nature of the yarn spun here makes every moment worth it.

Pleasantly, for a story-based album, Dust of Aeons features a bevy of vocal work. Good vocal work, at that. The fusion of unconventional folk-like clean vocals and crushing death metal vocals works incredibly well. It also provides a counter balance for the, occasionally, simply written songs. Then again, speed and over-complication is not exactly  great thing when your opening track lasts longer then your standard television program. As a guitar player, I could only imagine remembering the entirety of this album would be a superhuman feat at best.

But, that isn't to say Dust of Aeons doesn't feature a bevy of memorable riffs or compositions. Everything here is massive, monolithic, and when it isn't, the writing is teasing you with moments of death and black. The transitions between slow sorrowful doomy riffs, to crackling black, or crushing death, are done bafflingly well. How Towards Atlantis Lights manages to just change without some stop, or break, beforehand is beyond me. It's just about beyond anything I've ever heard before (at least when it comes to doom). Outside of this, there is a lot of piano work - a staple, I'm noticing, in doom's pieces to provide some variety when harsher writing isn't called for. But, despite my disdain towards the use of it - I can't deny that Towards Atlantis Lights, much like Et Moriemur, has done masterful things with the instrument.

I'll be honest, I hate most musicals but Towards Atlantis Lights isn't that, despite it having a narrative. The entire album feels like an experience, but doesn't sacrifice creative merit or provide emotion or atmosphere strictly though lyrics and vocals like your standard story-based album would. Every component is important in expressing what the group wants to say, and how they want you to feel about it.

-KEITH, THE ODD-